howllikeastark:

sii1ver:

Let me take a second to talk about these things. I found them while looking for makeup for my friends Kanaya cosplay and holycrap are they amazing. These are lip and eye liner, these pencils are a two in one deal- three in one if you want to use it as a lipstick.
Oh and the best part? You get all twelve colors for $5.21. If that’s not amazing, I don’t know what is. You can get them here. <3

i don’t even wear makeup and i want this

howllikeastark:

sii1ver:

Let me take a second to talk about these things. I found them while looking for makeup for my friends Kanaya cosplay and holycrap are they amazing. These are lip and eye liner, these pencils are a two in one deal- three in one if you want to use it as a lipstick.

Oh and the best part? You get all twelve colors for $5.21. If that’s not amazing, I don’t know what is. You can get them here. <3

i don’t even wear makeup and i want this

forestcatalog:

Loose harem pants ❤ EWE international Co,LTD (aliexpress)

$15,46

evabadon:

"when women wear makeup they’re basically lying to us" well i don’t see why i’m being blamed for a man stupid enough to really think i have red and gold eyelids

killyhawk:

Shopping for clothes when you have big boobs is normally really annoying esp when you like drapey things or want something that cinches at the waist cause you always get stuff like this

image

floweredprouvaire:

hey guys!!

so my mom has a shop on Etsy where she usually makes fandom related things - gloves, pillows, shoulder bags, etc., but she recently decided to start making pride beanies!! 

the ones pictured in the first photo are gay/lesbian, asexual, bisexual, pansexual, genderqueer, and transgender - the ones I’m wearing are pansexual and asexual.

these are only $15 with FREE SHIPPING on her etsy shop!

(Source: autumnprouvaire)

ivanhattori:

asslikemattfacelikegilinsky:

flavolaval:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

Men of tumblr. Your duty awaits

im just waiting for them to post pictures of themselves in these dresses

What started off as a joke has now done nothing but make me feel pretty… 

motionjessinwhite:

anotherpunk:

"Your dress is too short."

Thanks, the designer used your dick for inspiration.

OH MYG OD

(Source: euph0ricr3ality)

ineloquentformalities:

blackgirlsrpretty2:

SPOTLIGHT:

http://manakahandmade.tumblr.com/

How is it humanly possible to be so beautiful.

yesmissmori:

THINX Underwear:

OH SHIT YOU GUYS THIS COMPANY IS MAKING UNDERWEAR THAT IS STAIN RESISTANT, ANTIMICROBIAL, AND WILL ABSORB UP TO 6 TEASPOONS OF LIQUID BUT STILL LOOKS FUCKING SEXY

AND DID I MENTION THIS PART:

For every pair of THINX you buy, you help one girl in the developing world stay in school by providing her with seven washable, reusable cloth pads.

AND WHY IS THAT SUCH A BIG DEAL? HERE’S WHY:

After doing some research, Agrawal says she found that more than 100 million girls in the developing world were missing a week of school because of their periods, and using things such as leaves, old rags, or plastic bags in the place of sanitary pads.

THE SIZES RUN FROM XS TO XXL AND THE PRICES ARE NOT INSANE, THEY’RE OBVIOUSLY HIGHER THAN THOSE 5 FOR $10 SALES AT TARGET BUT YOU WON’T HAVE TO THROW THEM OUT BECAUSE YOU MISCALCULATED YOUR FLOW AND BLED ALL OVER THEM BEFORE YOU COULD GET TO A BATHROOM

I’M SORRY FOR SHOUTING I’M JUST REALLY EXCITED ABOUT THIS

LIKE HOLY FUCKBASKET IT’S ABOUT DAMN TIME

~The Despair of Mall Shopping~

Sweater from Sirens, skirt and nail polish from Stitches, and bows from Claire’s. Not one item over $20. 

putthison:

Why There’s No Good Writing About Fashion
Anne Hollander, author of Sex and Suits (among many other things), recently passed away. She penned this really good piece for Slate back in 1997 on the dismal state of fashion writing. An excerpt:

Fashion now seems like a club with a private jargon that leaves no room for the play of sensitive literary exposition. And good critical writing about clothing hardly exists at all. There is no tradition of clothes criticism that includes serious analysis, or even of costume criticism among theater, ballet, and opera critics, who do have an august writerly heritage. This fact may be what makes the fashion journalist hate her job—the painful sense that real work cannot be done in this genre, that it would be better, more honorable, to be writing about something else.
There are heartening exceptions. One is Amy Spindler of the New York Times, who seems to take clothes seriously without excess or apology, deploying a quick imagination and an interest in detail that give her writing a fine attentive sting. (A Versace show “opened with razor-sharp bias-cut asymmetrical navy dresses, stern except for a frill at the hem and a swatch of black lace that masked eyes.”) There was Kennedy Fraser, late of The New Yorker, whose witty essays on fashion published in that magazine during the 1970s have since, happily, been collected. Holly Brubach, who succeeded Fraser at TheNew Yorker, kept the standard high during her time there. A big exception is the fashion journalism of France, where a noticeable respect for fashion has been a standard common attitude since the 17th century. Fashion is as acceptable in France as any imaginative work, and criticism about it has certainly flourished there. […]
But fashion has been without honor in the English-speaking world for so long that we are afraid to take it seriously—solemnly, yes, as we take so many things, but not with ordinary seriousness. When we are not in raptures, or disapproving in the name of female realities, we are likely to wax sociological and psychological about fashion, to weigh it down with quasiscientific meaning—out of some ancient fear, perhaps, of its obvious debt to Eros.

It’s well worth a read, and you can see the rest here. 
(Thanks to Ivory Tower Style for the link)

putthison:

Why There’s No Good Writing About Fashion

Anne Hollander, author of Sex and Suits (among many other things), recently passed away. She penned this really good piece for Slate back in 1997 on the dismal state of fashion writing. An excerpt:

Fashion now seems like a club with a private jargon that leaves no room for the play of sensitive literary exposition. And good critical writing about clothing hardly exists at all. There is no tradition of clothes criticism that includes serious analysis, or even of costume criticism among theater, ballet, and opera critics, who do have an august writerly heritage. This fact may be what makes the fashion journalist hate her job—the painful sense that real work cannot be done in this genre, that it would be better, more honorable, to be writing about something else.

There are heartening exceptions. One is Amy Spindler of the New York Times, who seems to take clothes seriously without excess or apology, deploying a quick imagination and an interest in detail that give her writing a fine attentive sting. (A Versace show “opened with razor-sharp bias-cut asymmetrical navy dresses, stern except for a frill at the hem and a swatch of black lace that masked eyes.”) There was Kennedy Fraser, late of The New Yorker, whose witty essays on fashion published in that magazine during the 1970s have since, happily, been collected. Holly Brubach, who succeeded Fraser at TheNew Yorker, kept the standard high during her time there. A big exception is the fashion journalism of France, where a noticeable respect for fashion has been a standard common attitude since the 17th century. Fashion is as acceptable in France as any imaginative work, and criticism about it has certainly flourished there. […]

But fashion has been without honor in the English-speaking world for so long that we are afraid to take it seriously—solemnly, yes, as we take so many things, but not with ordinary seriousness. When we are not in raptures, or disapproving in the name of female realities, we are likely to wax sociological and psychological about fashion, to weigh it down with quasiscientific meaning—out of some ancient fear, perhaps, of its obvious debt to Eros.

It’s well worth a read, and you can see the rest here

(Thanks to Ivory Tower Style for the link)

steampunk-and-junk:

wickedclothes:

Tree Of Life Necklaces

Crafted out of copper and gemstones, these wire-wrapped necklaces feature amethyst and cherry quartz leaves, respectively. Each of these necklaces are hung on 18” copper chains. Sold on Etsy.

468,003 plays

epic-humor:

i need 6 minutes of this

(Source: katara)